BIO

BIO

Founded in the fall of 2012 by guitarists / singers Rob Banks and James Hurst, Beach Party was a smashed to basics garage punk band from the first night they played a pool party and the first morning they woke up drunk and wondering where those brand new head wounds had come from. This mystery was never solved but naturally, great things were in their future. By the time of their debut release one year later a flexi 7” produced in a sweaty garage studio by old friend Ty Segall Beach Party were a fully committed four piece band with bassist Adam Arcos and animalistic drummer Nico Macciocca, a line-up that would win them opening slots for Black Lips and Best Coast as well as sponsorship by a whiskey company, an honor earned by Beach Party’s Olympic level whiskey drinking abilities. Now in the spring of 2014, Beach Party prepares to release their Self Titled EP, with two of the songs recorded by Segall and three more recorded by Sonny Diperi at L.A.’s notorious Lair studio. Barely contained within are five songs that reveal this band as caveman cousins to ‘60s scorchers like the Standells, glammed-out ‘70s ass-kickers like the Dictators and punk destroyers like the Weirdos and the Adolescents, who never dropped a note no matter how many lunatics came charging their stage. (This is something Beach Party also does very well try it yourself!) Live favorite “Catch That Train” is a call and response Back From The Grave-style snarler supercharged into something from Redd Kross’ crazed punker classic Born Innocent, while the track “Can’t Surf” is a slow-mo riff-out, about the insurmountable hassles of actually going surfing, powered by a few grinding chords and topped by a woozy lead guitar practically drowning in its own reverb. “My Baby” is a sweetheart collision between punch drunk Heartbreakers style glam and California power-pop with a chord change in the middle strategically designed for maximum guitar romanticism. Closer “Fun” is Beach Party’s signature song not just for the chorus, which pretty much demands you finish your beer and sing along, but for the way everything they do comes together at once. It’s the tough side of ‘60s garage, the too-smart-for-its-own-good part of first-wave punk and the jet-engine beginnings of hardcore, when a band like the Zero Boys could share a bill with the Ramones and everyone would go home happy and bloody. Which, funnily enough, is exactly the way Beach Party started in the first place